Congressional Leaders Agree to 1-Year Extension of Excise Tax Relief for Alcohol Producers, Importers

Leaders in the House Ways and Means and Senate Finance committees reached a tax deal late Monday that includes a one-year extension of the federal excise tax relief for alcohol producers and importers. The extension of the Craft Beverage Modernization and Tax Reform Act — which was set to expire at the end of this year after being passed into law in 2017 as part of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act — had been a top priority for beer industry trade groups the Beer Institute (BI) and the Brewers Association (BA), as well as the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States (DISCUS), the American Craft Spirits Association, Wine America, the Wine Institute, and the U.S. Association of Cider Makers. Those groups had sought permanence, although a one-year extension appeared to be the likeliest outcome after the House Ways and Means Committee announced support for an extension through 2020. The legislation garnered bipartisan support, with 326 cosponsors in the House and 73 cosponsors in the Senate. The extender would keep in place through December 31, 2020, an excise tax rate of $3.50 per barrel (a reduction from $7 per barrel) on the first 60,000 barrels for domestic brewers producing fewer...

Five percent beer to hit shelves in Utah | Government and Politics

The Budweiser Clydesdales roll down 25th Street to deliver 5% beer to local bars and restaurants on Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, in downtown Ogden. On Friday, Nov. 1, 2019, Utah is saying goodbye to 3.2% beer on draft taps and grocery stores making way for a new law allowing 5% beer to be sold. The Budweiser Clydesdales roll down 25th Street to deliver 5% beer to local bars and restaurants on Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, in downtown Ogden. On Friday, Nov. 1, 2019, Utah is saying goodbye to 3.2% beer on draft taps and grocery stores making way for a new law allowing 5% beer to be sold. Beer sold in Utah’s grocery and convenience stores will have a higher alcohol content as of Friday as a new state law goes into effect. SB 132, which passed through the state Legislature on the last day of the general session, allows bars, breweries, restaurants and convenience stores to sell alcoholic beverages containing 5% alcohol by volume, an increase from the 4% ABV that has been the legal limit up to this point. Retailers in Utah County experienced beer shortages as they prepared for the new law to take effect. Rajeev Kumar, who works at the 7-Eleven in Provo at 222 W. 300 South, said his store had ...