Its most amusing moments are in the interplay between the central characters as they adjust to an abruptly shifting reality. The strengths and pleasures of Tina Gordon Chism’s Little lie neither in its ramshackle, uneven script nor in its familiar high-concept conceit, in which a successful, cold-blooded CEO suddenly awakens to find herself in the body of her formerly insecure, bullied 13-year-old self. No, the film’s most amusing and delightful moments are in the interplay between the central characters as they adjust to an abruptly shifting reality. As the tightly wound tech mogul Jordan Sanders, Regina Hall isn’t given much room to show off her talents, as Jordan simply exists to either berate her assistant, April (Issa Rae), ruthlessly shoot down all of her employees’ ideas, or repeatedly boot her pesky boy toy (Luke James) out of her penthouse after she’s had her fun with him. Hall does what she can to inject brief glimpses of vulnerability into her one-note, self-aggrandizing bully, but it’s only after a bit of well-timed transformative magic cuts Jordan down to size and the magnetic Marsai Martin steps on screen that Little begins, at least for a time, to find its footing...