Utility-friendly lawmakers and regulators have shielded Ohio utility power plant affiliates from competition at customers’ expense. This conversation is moderated according to USA TODAY’s community rules. Please read the rules before joining the discussion. Lamp post illuminates on a shared space at the intersection of Cypress Ave., Landchester Rd., and South Hills Dr., in Cleveland on Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. (Photo: Marvin Fong / The Plain Dealer) This article is part of a joint investigative project by Eye on Ohio and the Energy News Network. Enter your email address below to receive email alerts on future installments. #mc_embed_signup{background:#fff; clear:left; font:14px Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; } /* Add your own Mailchimp form style overrides in your site stylesheet or in this style block. We recommend moving this block and the preceding CSS link to the HEAD of your HTML file. */ In a residential neighborhood south of downtown Cleveland, a decorative lamppost provides a stark illustration of what critics say is an abusive system of surcharges that have created billions of dollars in subsidies for the state’s utilities. The 150-watt light in a tiny residential p...