The Grateful Dead’s Bob Weir Is 72 and Still Crushing Workouts

THERE’S A LOT GOING ON HERE. Bob Weir, 72-year-old founding member of the Grateful Dead, is running around Jiffy Lube Live amphitheater in Bristow, Virginia, on a 95 degree day in June. “We’ll start off by going for a trot,” he said a few minutes ago, after stepping out of his tour bus wearing a sleeveless tee, capri-length sweats, and toed shoes. He looks like a Civil War general who’s really into CrossFit. Five minutes into this run, he’s already covered a lot of ground: how to incorporate his Apple watch into his workouts, how the shoes changed his life, how he meditates on tour. But right now he wants to tell a little story about his ol’ pal Rolling Thunder. “I got hit with a chop block when I was a defensive end in high school. My ankles were weak for years,” says Weir, in full canter now, starting to sweat a little. “So when I became an exercise junkie in my 20s, I used to turn my ankles a bunch. Anyway, I had a friend, a Shoshone healer. Rolling Thunder. I used to see him work on people with an owl’s wing and cedar smoke. I said, ‘Chief, would you consider doctoring my ankles?’ He stood me up and said, ‘When you’re running, have you ever thought about looking down a...

Aerial yoga isn’t at the top of many programming lists, but it’s worth considering if you’d

Aerial yoga isn’t at the top of many programming lists, but it’s worth considering if you’d like a unique fitness class that really grabs students’ attention. At the University of Florida, it’s called “flying yoga,” and has become a very popular small group training class in the Gators rec center. Incorporating long silks into various yoga poses, flying yoga helps students get closer to their inner acrobat. And performing some complicated twists and turns while hanging from the silks can be a pretty intense workout. For more insight on flying yoga, its benefits and some best practices for integration, Campus Rec spoke to Leah Shelley, Florida’s assistant director for fitness programs: LH: Flying yoga provides an opportunity for students to find themselves in more active and passive inversion poses — inversions include anything where the head is below the heart. The fullest expression of most inversions in a mat-based yoga class can require a special skill set in balance, strength and flexibility. However, in flying yoga, participants can find themselves benefitting from intense inversion postures they may not be able to get into in a mat-based class. LH: Our flying yoga classes ...